fbpx
0%
NCSF Personal Training Study Guide Chapter 5 – Evaluating Health and Physical Fitness 1

If you have not yet signed up for the NCSF CPT certification, receive a big discount here.

Get your copy of the NCSF CPT exam cheat sheet. It helps immensely for studying for the exam.

Make sure to check out Trainer Academy for premium NCSF CPT study materials. They will reduce study time by 50% and have an exam pass guarantee. Read my full review on them here. You can save $100 on their MVP study system with the code: PTPSUB

Post Content

    Chapter Goals:

    • Find the common factors that impact our health and fitness.
    • Know the relationship between quality of life and level of activity.
    • Define the key terms throughout the chapter.
    • Find the specific injuries associated with common activities.
    • Know the documents used to screen individuals prior to starting an exercise program.

    Factors that Affect Fitness

    The baseline measurements in fitness are going to be influenced heavily by genetics, environment, and stress the body has experienced each day.

    For someone that is sedentary, the strongest factor, besides lack of activity, is going to be a genetic predisposition.

    Sedentary is used to describe a lifestyle where behavioral patterns include very little physical activity.

    A genetic predisposition is something that increases propensity toward conditioning or outcome based on one’s inherited genes.

    A person’s genetics usually account for around 40% or all the way up to 66% of the uncontrollable hereditary factors affecting physical health and performance components. That leaves the remaining 40 – 60% as controllable factors that can be manipulated for improvement.

    There are many environmental factors that affect physical fitness with each one having its own co-factors.

    A big factor that plays into the behaviors people partake in is interest.

    The basic factors that we find impacting our fitness are:

    • Genetics, age, and sex
    • Environment
    • Social factors
    • Stress
    • Nutrition
    • Levels of daily activity
    • Education and economic factors

    For many people, the simple knowledge of the benefits of physical activity is enough to make the decision to partake in some form of activity every day.

    Physical Activity and Life Quality

    Health-related quality of life is an important outcome coming from wellness behaviors.

    The perception of improved physical function in activities of daily living is one of the more important effects on physical activity.

    Most people may be able to complete activities of daily living, but it is usually well-documented that we see improvements in ease or proficiency in these tasks with regular physical activity.

    Exclusive PTP Offers


    Gold Standard Cert
    Save 25%
    Most Popular Cert
    3 Certs for 1
    A Good Option
    50% off
    Best Study Materials
    See MVP discount
    Best online PT course
    $100 Off
    The Top PT Software
    Get Free Trial

    The factors seen to affect health-related quality of life include things such as education, spiritual, family, health and safety, work, stress, and psychological factors.

    As it goes now, premature mortality and overall mortality are mainly caused due to controllable diseases.

    Premature mortality is the measure of unfilled life expectancy or death prior to the age of 75.

    Mortality is death that occurs in a population or other group.

    Physical Activity and Risk for Injury

    Exercise is proven to improve the quality of life for most people. This holds true for people who are healthy or diagnosed with a disease.

    Novice exercisers will have an increase in the risk of these things when proper acclimation periods are not applied:

    • Muscle strains or tendon strains
    • Tears and sprains of ligaments
    • Fractures of bones

    Some other conditions to know about are:

    Hyperthermia – a dangerous increase in body temperature above normal, which can lead to heat illnesses like exhaustion or stroke.

    Hypothermia – a dangerous decrease in body temperature lower than normal levels that leads to diminished control of the body, frostbite, or death.

    Rhabdomyolysis – this is a life-threatening condition that occurs from the destruction of muscle tissue and subsequent release of muscle fiber content to the bloodstream, which may cause major organ failure.

    Hyponatremia – this is a lower-than-normal plasma sodium concentration.

    Considerations for Pre-Exercise Screening

    Screening someone before a program may allow for the right modifications to be made so that the risk of many conditions can be avoided in physical activity.

    It is possible that exercise causes more harm than good, especially in people who have some form of cardiovascular pathology. Some of these conditions are arrhythmias, acute angina, and myocardial infarction.

    Another condition that is increasing within the united states is type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Type 2 diabetes is a metabolic disorder where there is high blood pressure, resistance to insulin, and a lack of production of insulin. It is often the result of little activity and the presence of obesity.

    Pre-Exercise Screening

    There is a lot of research saying that daily physical activity is vital to healthy aging. Data also suggests the absence of routine leads to greater danger than the inherent risks of physical activity.

    The main reason that we screen clients before they participate in a program is to find the possible factors that increase the risks of injury when doing exercise.

    The Benefits of Client Screening:

    1. Educating the client about relative health risks associated with their lifestyle, behaviors, and history.

    2. Identifying current health status compared to recommended ranges.

    3. Providing data that will be used to create a needs analysis as the basis for the exercise prescription.

    4. Establishing starting points and predictions of performance.

    5. Identifying interests, aptitudes, or possible limitations.

    Liability is the state of being responsible for something, especially by law. This is an important reason that we have screening prior to entering training programs.

    Ignoring these simple screening rules that we have set could result in professional negligence.

    For our purposes of fitness and health, the exercise screening should be:

    Exclusive PTP Offers


    Gold Standard Cert
    Save 25%
    Most Popular Cert
    3 Certs for 1
    A Good Option
    50% off
    Best Study Materials
    See MVP discount
    Best online PT course
    $100 Off
    The Top PT Software
    Get Free Trial
    • Practical and give us information
    • Viable across multiple segments of the population
    • Effective at identifying those at risk for untoward events

    Informed Consent

    This is not necessarily a screening form, but instead more of a waiver that requests voluntary permission or consent for health screening, fitness evaluation, and/or exercise participation.

    The document is needed to have a clear explanation of the contents, specific details of the program and its activities, and the risks and benefits that come with participation.

    Components of Informed Consent

    • A reasonable explanation of procedures
    • Normal physiological expectations
    • Assumed risks of participation
    • Reasonably expected benefits
    • Opportunity for inquiry
    • Right of refusal
    • Right of confidentiality
    • Background and purpose

    PAR-Q+

    This stands for the physical activity readiness questionnaire for everyone. The plus represents the most recent updates to it.

    The primary objective of this form is to find the people who may be at an increased risk for some form of a cardiac event.

    This new + form has seven questions which serve as a red flag for the trainer if answered yes to any of them. It also then expands on those questions a bit further.

    Health Status Questionnaire (HSQ)

    This is split into the sections of general client information, self-reported health and fitness status, current medical information, medical history, and self-reported psychological considerations.

    The key risk areas are:

    • Family history of cardiovascular
    • Undesirable blood lipid profiles
    • Metabolic disease
    • High blood pressure
    • Current medications
    • Previous injuries or surgeries
    • Smoking history
    • Sedentary lifestyle
    • Obesity
    • Impaired glucose tolerance

    Behavior Questionnaire

    The behavior questionnaire follows the health status questionnaire in a comprehensive screening process.

    There are several reasons this form is useful:

    Identifying obstacles to the program goals and needed improvements in health status.

    Identifying factors correlating to current health status.

    Providing the opportunity to educate clients about how their behaviors impact their health.

    Identifying appropriate behavior management strategies.

    Compiling the Data

    When getting the information all together, we are looking for medical problems and disease, signs and symptoms that show disease, characteristics of some form of health risk is increased, and lifestyle factors that increase health risks.

    A needs analysis is something we can create to help narrow down the information. This usually includes health, fitness, and behavior needs, and the potential remedies we have for these areas.

    NCSF Personal Training Study Guide Chapter 5 – Evaluating Health and Physical Fitness 2
    NCSF Personal Training Study Guide Chapter 5 – Evaluating Health and Physical Fitness 3
    NCSF Personal Training Study Guide Chapter 5 – Evaluating Health and Physical Fitness 4

    About The Author

    Leave a Comment

    Your email address will not be published.

    NCSF CPT exam cheat sheet

    Get The Sectret Cheat Sheet For The CSCS Exam

    18749

    Get The Sectret Cheat Sheet For The ACSM Exam

    18749

    Get The Sectret Cheat Sheet For The NCSF CPT Exam

    18749

    Get The Sectret Cheat Sheet For The ISSA Nutritionist Exam

    18749

    Get The Sectret Cheat Sheet For The NCSF CPT Exam

    18749

    Get The Sectret Cheat Sheet For The NASM CNC Exam

    18749

    Get The Sectret Cheat Sheet For The NASM PES Exam

    18749

    Get The Sectret Cheat Sheet For The NASM CES Exam

    18749

    Get the top 5 Tips for Passing the ACE CPT

    18749

    Get the top 5 Tips for Passing the NASM CPT

    18749

    Get The Sectret Cheat Sheet For The NSCA CPT Exam

    18749

    Get The Sectret Cheat Sheet For The ACE Exam

    18749

    Get The Sectret Cheat Sheet For The NASM Exam

    18749

    Get The Sectret Cheat Sheet For The ISSA Exam

    18749
    Scroll to Top